Commands tagged apt-cache (10)

  • This will take the packages matching a given `apt-cache search` query (a collection of AND'd words or regexps) and tell you how popular they are. This is particularly nice for those times you have to figure out which solution to use for e.g. a PDF reader or a VNC client. Substitute "ubuntu.com" for "debian.org" if you want this to use Ubuntu's data instead. Everything else will work perfectly. Show Sample Output


    4
    apt-popcon() { (echo \#rank; apt-cache search "[email protected]" |awk '$1 !~ /^lib/ {print " "$1" "}') |grep -Ff- <(wget -qqO- http://popcon.debian.org/by_inst.gz |gunzip); }
    adamhotep · 2012-09-08 00:29:31 0
  • Like 7172, but much easier.


    3
    aptitude install '?and(~nlib.*perl, ~Dmodule)'
    cogsmos · 2010-11-26 18:12:00 0
  • If the first two letters are "ii", then the package is installed. You can also use wildcards. For example, . dpkg -l openoffice* . Note that dpkg will usually not report packages which are available but uninstalled. If you want to see both which versions are installed and which versions are available, use this command instead: . apt-cache policy python Show Sample Output


    1
    dpkg -l python
    hackerb9 · 2011-01-05 06:15:13 1
  • Replace PACKAGE with desired package name. Found here: http://mikebeach.org/2011/04/undo-apt-get-build-dep/


    1
    sudo aptitude markauto $(apt-cache showsrc PACKAGE | grep Build-Depends | perl -p -e 's/(?:[\[(].+?[\])]|Build-Depends:|,|\|)//g')
    Lexton · 2011-05-08 14:18:52 0

  • 1
    sudo apt-cache dumpavail | grep Package | cut -d ' ' -f 2 > available.packages
    mered · 2013-05-18 20:42:22 1
  • In this case, linux- is the prefix; simply running apt-cache pkgnames would list every package APT knows about. The default APT config assumes -g, --generate; to use the cache as/is, you could similarly run: apt-cache --no-generate pkgnames [prefix] Adding --all-names, like so: apt-cache --no-generate --all-names pkgnames [prefix] would print all the packages APT knows about, using the cache as/is, including virtual packages and missing dependencies. This command was shamelessly stolen from the apt-cache(8) man-page. Show Sample Output


    1
    apt-cache pkgnames linux-
    benjabean1 · 2014-12-14 06:48:57 0

  • 0
    apt-cache depends <packagename>
    piccobello · 2011-07-18 15:15:28 0

  • 0
    apt-cache rdepends <packagename>
    piccobello · 2011-07-18 15:17:02 0
  • I personally like it very much and have wrapped it into a function, named "apt-propos" ;), also you can use --names-only option for a sort-of "apt-whatis"


    0
    apt-cache search byo | sed "s/^\([[:alnum:]\.-]*\) - /\1=%%%=- /" | column -s '=%%%=' -t
    VoidDroid · 2015-10-18 10:55:34 0
  • I used this to mass install a lot of perl stuff. Threw it together because I was feeling *especially* lazy. The 'perl' and the 'module' can be replaced with whatever you like.


    -2
    apt-cache search perl | grep module | awk '{print $1;}' | xargs sudo apt-get install -y
    captwheeto · 2010-11-26 14:00:39 0

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