Commands tagged suffix (1)

  • make, find and a lot of other programs can take a lot of time. And can do not. Supppose you write a long, complicated command and wonder if it will be done in 3 seconds or 20 minutes. Just add "R" (without quotes) suffix to it and you can do other things: zsh will inform you when you can see the results. You can replace zenity with other X Window dialogs program.


    1
    alias -g R=' &; jobs | tail -1 | read A0 A1 A2 cmd; echo "running $cmd"; fg "$cmd"; zenity --info --text "$cmd done"; unset A0 A1 A2 cmd'
    pipeliner · 2010-12-13 17:44:36 0

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