Commands tagged pdfnup (1)

  • This is an example of the usage of pdfnup (you can find it in the 'pdfjam' package). With this command you can save ink/toner and paper (and thus trees!) when you print a pdf. This tools are very configurable, and you can make also 2x2, 3x2, 2x3 layouts, and more (the limit is your fantasy and the resolution of the printer :-) You must have installed pdfjam, pdflatex, and the LaTeX pdfpages package in your box. Show Sample Output


    3
    pdfnup --nup 2x1 --frame true --landscape --outfile output.pdf input.pdf
    TetsuyO · 2010-12-21 14:20:06 0

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