Commands tagged arch linux (12)

  • An alternative to: python -m SimpleHTTPServer for Arch Linux source: http://archlinux.me/dusty/2010/01/15/simplehttpserver-in-python-3/ Show Sample Output


    5
    python3 -m http.server
    TheShadowFog · 2011-12-07 23:43:21 0
  • This one-liner will output installed packages sorted by size in Kilobytes. Show Sample Output


    4
    paste <(pacman -Q | awk '{ print $1; }' | xargs pacman -Qi | grep 'Size' | awk '{ print $4$5; }') <(pacman -Q | awk '{print $1; }') | sort -n | column -t
    BruceLEET · 2011-01-07 18:43:18 0
  • -Qdt Lists dependencies/packages which are no longer required by any packages -q Output only package name (not the version number) -R Remove package(s) Rest is self-explanatory. I just started out with Arch - so if there is any better/standard method to achieve the same - please suggest.


    4
    pacman -Qdt -q | xargs pacman --noconfirm -R
    b_t · 2014-02-27 05:17:57 0
  • If, while using a program, you get an error similar to: error while loading shared libraries: libusb-0.1.so.4: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory Use pacman or pkgfile to search for the package that owns the missing library https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/General_troubleshooting#Message:_%22error_while_loading_shared_libraries%22 Show Sample Output


    2
    pacman -Fs libusb-0.1.so.4
    Mouath · 2019-03-07 16:15:10 0
  • The lastb command presents you with the history of failed login attempts (stored in /var/log/btmp). The reference file is read/write by root only by default. This can be quite an exhaustive list with lots of bots hammering away at your machine. Sometimes it is more important to see the scale of things, or in this case the volume of failed logins tied to each source IP. The awk statement determines if the 3rd element is an IP address, and if so increments the running count of failed login attempts associated with it. When done it prints the IP and count. The sort statement sorts numerically (-n) by column 3 (-k 3), so you can see the most aggressive sources of login attempts. Note that the ':' character is the 2nd column, and that the -n and -k can be combined to -nk. Please be aware that the btmp file will contain every instance of a failed login unless explicitly rolled over. It should be safe to delete/archive this file after you've processed it. Show Sample Output


    1
    sudo lastb | awk '{if ($3 ~ /([[:digit:]]{1,3}\.){3}[[:digit:]]{1,3}/)a[$3] = a[$3]+1} END {for (i in a){print i " : " a[i]}}' | sort -nk 3
    sgowie · 2012-09-11 14:51:10 0

  • 0
    pacman -Qi $(pacman -Qq)|grep 'Name\|Size'| cut -d: -f2 | paste - - | column -t | sort -nk2
    minus · 2011-05-03 13:02:06 1
  • M is size in megabytes, man expac to see other sizes %m is install size %k is download size


    0
    expac -S -H M "%m %n"|sort -n
    gtmanfred · 2012-06-14 19:41:21 0
  • I used this (along with a modified one replacing `mkv` with `srt`) to remove the slight differences in who the provider of the video / matching subtitle was (as they are the same contents and the subs match anyway). So now VLC (and other video players) can easily guess the subtitle file. Show Sample Output


    0
    perl-rename -v 's/720p.+mkv/720p\.mkv/' *.mkv
    benkaiser · 2014-09-25 14:07:47 0
  • This version accounts for the MiB/KiB suffix output by pacman these days.


    0
    pacman -Qi | grep 'Name\|Size\|Description' | cut -d: -f2 | paste - - - | awk -F'\t' 'BEGIN{ s["MiB"]=1024; s["KiB"]=1;} {split($3, a, " "); print a[1] * s[a[2]], "KiB", $1}' | sort -n
    Timo · 2018-04-24 13:29:57 0

  • 0
    echo -e "\n[sublime-text]\nServer = https://download.sublimetext.com/arch/dev/x86_64" | sudo tee -a /etc/pacman.conf
    HaoZeke · 2018-08-13 07:30:55 0
  • Writes hybrid ISO directly to USB stick; replace /dev/sdb with USB device in question and the ISO image link with the link of your choice


    0
    wget -O /dev/sdb https://cdimage.ubuntu.com/daily-live/current/eoan-desktop-amd64.iso
    realkstrawn93 · 2019-09-19 04:03:13 0
  • This, like the other commands listed here, displays installed arch packages. Unlike the other ones this also displays the short description so you can see what that package does without having to go to google. It also shows the largest packages on top. You can optionally pipe this through head to display an arbitrary number of the largest packages installed (e.g. ... | head -30 # for the largest 30 packages installed) Show Sample Output


    -1
    pacman -Qi | grep 'Name\|Size\|Description' | cut -d: -f2 | paste - - - | awk -F'\t' '{ print $2, "\t", $1, "\t", $3 }' | sort -rn
    GetterNoCheddar · 2012-11-20 03:40:55 0

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Check These Out

Use jq to validate and pretty-print json output
The `jq` tool can also be used do validate json files and pretty print output: ` jq < file.json` Available on several platforms, including newer debian-based systems via `#sudo apt install jq`, mac via `brew install jq`, and from source https://stedolan.github.io/jq/download/ This alternative to the original avoids the useless use of cat

Create a mirror of a local folder, on a remote server
Create a exact mirror of the local folder "/root/files", on remote server 'remote_server' using SSH command (listening on port 22) (all files & folders on destination server/folder will be deleted)

Faster find and move using the find and xargs commands. Almost as fast as locate.
Only tested on Linux Ubunty Hardy. Works when file names have spaces. The "-maxdepth 2" limits the find search to the current directory and the next one deeper in this example. This was faster on my system because find was searching every directory before the current directory without the -maxdepth option. Almost as fast as locate when used as above. Must use double quotes around pattern to handle spaces in file names. -print0 is used in combination with xargs -0. Those are zeros not "O"s. For xargs, -I is used to replace the following "{}" with the incoming file-list items from find. Echo just prints to the command line what is happening with mv. mv needs "{}" again so it knows what you are moving from. Then end with the move destination. Some other versions may only require one "{}" in the move command and not after the -I, however this is what worked for me on Ubuntu 8.04. Some like to use -type f in the find command to limit the type.

check the status of 'dd' in progress (OS X)
"killall -USR1 dd" does not work in OS X for me. However, sending INFO instead of USR1 works.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Flush and then immediately start watching a file
This is useful for keeping an eye on an error log while developing. The !^ pulls the first arg from the previous command (which needs to be run in a sub-shell for this shortcut to work).

Search some text from all files inside a directory

mount a cdrom

Re-read partition table on specified device without rebooting system (here /dev/sda).

Clear your history saved into .bash_history file!
Note the space before the command; that prevents your history eliminating command from being recorded. ' history -c && rm -f ~/.bash_history' Both steps are needed. 'history -c' clears what you see in the history command. 'rm -f ~/.bash_history' deletes the history file in your home directory.


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