Commands tagged arch.linux (5)

  • This one-liner will output installed packages sorted by size in Kilobytes. Show Sample Output


    4
    paste <(pacman -Q | awk '{ print $1; }' | xargs pacman -Qi | grep 'Size' | awk '{ print $4$5; }') <(pacman -Q | awk '{print $1; }') | sort -n | column -t
    BruceLEET · 2011-01-07 18:43:18 0

  • 0
    pacman -Qi $(pacman -Qq)|grep 'Name\|Size'| cut -d: -f2 | paste - - | column -t | sort -nk2
    minus · 2011-05-03 13:02:06 1
  • M is size in megabytes, man expac to see other sizes %m is install size %k is download size


    0
    expac -S -H M "%m %n"|sort -n
    gtmanfred · 2012-06-14 19:41:21 0
  • This version accounts for the MiB/KiB suffix output by pacman these days.


    0
    pacman -Qi | grep 'Name\|Size\|Description' | cut -d: -f2 | paste - - - | awk -F'\t' 'BEGIN{ s["MiB"]=1024; s["KiB"]=1;} {split($3, a, " "); print a[1] * s[a[2]], "KiB", $1}' | sort -n
    Timo · 2018-04-24 13:29:57 0
  • This, like the other commands listed here, displays installed arch packages. Unlike the other ones this also displays the short description so you can see what that package does without having to go to google. It also shows the largest packages on top. You can optionally pipe this through head to display an arbitrary number of the largest packages installed (e.g. ... | head -30 # for the largest 30 packages installed) Show Sample Output


    -1
    pacman -Qi | grep 'Name\|Size\|Description' | cut -d: -f2 | paste - - - | awk -F'\t' '{ print $2, "\t", $1, "\t", $3 }' | sort -rn
    GetterNoCheddar · 2012-11-20 03:40:55 0

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