Commands tagged pacman (10)

  • This one-liner will output installed packages sorted by size in Kilobytes. Show Sample Output


    4
    paste <(pacman -Q | awk '{ print $1; }' | xargs pacman -Qi | grep 'Size' | awk '{ print $4$5; }') <(pacman -Q | awk '{print $1; }') | sort -n | column -t
    BruceLEET · 2011-01-07 18:43:18 0
  • -Qdt Lists dependencies/packages which are no longer required by any packages -q Output only package name (not the version number) -R Remove package(s) Rest is self-explanatory. I just started out with Arch - so if there is any better/standard method to achieve the same - please suggest.


    4
    pacman -Qdt -q | xargs pacman --noconfirm -R
    b_t · 2014-02-27 05:17:57 0
  • If, while using a program, you get an error similar to: error while loading shared libraries: libusb-0.1.so.4: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory Use pacman or pkgfile to search for the package that owns the missing library https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/General_troubleshooting#Message:_%22error_while_loading_shared_libraries%22 Show Sample Output


    2
    pacman -Fs libusb-0.1.so.4
    Mouath · 2019-03-07 16:15:10 1
  • Alternative1 (grep support): pacman -Ss python | paste - - | grep --color=always -e '/python' | less -R Alternative2 (eye-candy, no grep): pacman --color=always -Ss "python" | paste - - | less -R in ~/.bashrc: pkg-grep() { pacman -Ss "$1" | paste - - | grep --color=always -e "${2:-$1}" | less -R ; } pkg-search() { pacman --color=always -Ss "python" | paste - - | less -R; } Show Sample Output


    1
    pacman -Ss python | paste - - | grep --color=always -e '/python' | less -R
    hute37 · 2016-01-25 14:29:31 1

  • 0
    pacman -Qi $(pacman -Qq)|grep 'Name\|Size'| cut -d: -f2 | paste - - | column -t | sort -nk2
    minus · 2011-05-03 13:02:06 1
  • M is size in megabytes, man expac to see other sizes %m is install size %k is download size


    0
    expac -S -H M "%m %n"|sort -n
    gtmanfred · 2012-06-14 19:41:21 0
  • In this example I am returning all the files in /usr/bin that weren't put there by pacman, so that they can be moved to /usr/local/bin where they (most likely) belong. Show Sample Output


    0
    for file in /usr/bin/*; do pacman -Qo "$file" &> /dev/null || echo "$file"; done
    malathion · 2014-04-22 21:57:08 0
  • This version accounts for the MiB/KiB suffix output by pacman these days.


    0
    pacman -Qi | grep 'Name\|Size\|Description' | cut -d: -f2 | paste - - - | awk -F'\t' 'BEGIN{ s["MiB"]=1024; s["KiB"]=1;} {split($3, a, " "); print a[1] * s[a[2]], "KiB", $1}' | sort -n
    Timo · 2018-04-24 13:29:57 0

  • 0
    echo -e "\n[sublime-text]\nServer = https://download.sublimetext.com/arch/dev/x86_64" | sudo tee -a /etc/pacman.conf
    HaoZeke · 2018-08-13 07:30:55 0
  • This, like the other commands listed here, displays installed arch packages. Unlike the other ones this also displays the short description so you can see what that package does without having to go to google. It also shows the largest packages on top. You can optionally pipe this through head to display an arbitrary number of the largest packages installed (e.g. ... | head -30 # for the largest 30 packages installed) Show Sample Output


    -1
    pacman -Qi | grep 'Name\|Size\|Description' | cut -d: -f2 | paste - - - | awk -F'\t' '{ print $2, "\t", $1, "\t", $3 }' | sort -rn
    GetterNoCheddar · 2012-11-20 03:40:55 0

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