Commands tagged ,Date (5)

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Speak the top 6 lines of your twitter timeline every 5 minutes.....
Pump up the chatter, run this script on a regular basis to listen to your twitter timeline. This is a rough first cut using several cli clips I have spotted around. There is no facility to not read those things already read to you. This could also easily be put in a loop for timed onslaught from the chatterverse, though I think it might violate several pointsof the Geneva Convention UPDATE - added a loop, only reads the first 6 twits, and does this every 5 mins.

display emerge.log date in a human friendly way
gentoo only or gentoo-like linux distributions.

execute command on all files of certain types excluding folders that match pattern

interactive rss-based colorful commandline-fu reader perl oneliner (v0.1)
required packages: curl, xml2, html2text command is truncated, see 'sample output'

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

most used commands in history (comprehensive)
Most of the "most used commands" approaches does not consider pipes and other complexities. This approach considers pipes, process substitution by backticks or $() and multiple commands separated by ; Perl regular expression breaks up each line using | or < ( or ; or ` or $( and picks the first word (excluding "do" in case of for loops) note: if you are using lots of perl one-liners, the perl commands will be counted as well in this approach, since semicolon is used as a separator

identify NEEDED sonames in a path
This works in combination with http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/10496/identify-exported-sonames-in-a-path as it reports the NEEDED entries present in the files within a given path. You can then compare it with the libraries that are exported to make sure that, when cross-building a firmware image, you're not bringing in dependencies from the build host. The short version of it as can be seen in the same output is $ scanelf -RBnq -F "+n#f" $1 | tr ',' '\n' | sort -u

Route outbound SMTP connections through a addtional IP address rather than your primary

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Show the UUID of a filesystem or partition
Shows the UUID of the given partition (here /dev/sda7). Doesn't need to be root.


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