Commands tagged openssl (44)

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

Print every Nth line
Sometimes commands give you too much feedback. Perhaps 1/100th might be enough. If so, every() is for you. $ my_verbose_command | every 100 will print every 100th line of output. Specifically, it will print lines 100, 200, 300, etc If you use a negative argument it will print the *first* of a block, $ my_verbose_command | every -100 It will print lines 1, 101, 201, 301, etc The function wraps up this useful sed snippet: $ ... | sed -n '0~100p' don't print anything by default $ sed -n starting at line 0, then every hundred lines ( ~100 ) print. $ '0~100p' There's also some bash magic to test if the number is negative: we want character 0, length 1, of variable N. $ ${N:0:1} If it *is* negative, strip off the first character ${N:1} is character 1 onwards (second actual character).

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Cleanly manage tempfiles in scripts
Cleanly create tempfiles using mktemp and remove them using traps instead of removing them in the end of the script. This way, you make sure the tempfiles are removed properly even if the script is killed or interrupted. For a user script in KDE4, you can set TMPROOT using : $ TMPROOT=$(kde4-config --path tmp)

List all files opened by a particular command
List all file opened by a particular command based on it's command name.

Force wrap all text to 80 columns in Vim
This is assuming that you're editing some file that has not been wrapped at 80 columns, and you want it to be wrapped. While in Vim, enter ex mode, and set the textwidth to 80 columns: $ :set textwidth=80 Then, press: $ gg to get to the top of the file, and: $ gqG to wrap every line from the top to the bottom of the file at 80 characters. Of course, this will lose any indentation blocks you've setup if typing up some source code, or doing type setting. You can make modifications to this command as needed, as 'gq' is the formatting command you want, then you could send the formatting to a specific line in the file, rather than to the end of the file. $ gq49G Will apply the format from your current cursor location to the 49th row. And so on.

Run a command if file/directory changes
Example: $ runonchange /etc/nginx nginx -t Ignores vim temp files. Depends on 'inotify-tools' for monitoring of file changes. Alternative to tools like 'entr', 'watchr'.

Look up a unicode character by name
No need for further filedes or substitution for splitting. Simply use read a b

Get CPU thermal data on MacOS

Propagate a directory to another and create symlink to content
Lndir create from source directory to destination directory a full symlink tree of all contents of source directory, really useful for propagate changes from a directory to another.

concatenate avi files
concatenates avi files


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: