Commands tagged ipv4 (8)

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RELINK a lot of broken symlinks - FIX broken symlinks after rsync site to new server
After you run this script, you can check status for broken symlink with this command: find -L . -type l

Watch the size of a directory using figlet
You can substitute /home/$USER with any path you like.

Calculate pi to an arbitrary number of decimal places
Change the scale to adjust number of decimal places prefix the command with "time" to benchmark the computer (compare how long it takes to calculate 10000 digits of pi on various computers).

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

Decrypt exported android wallet keys for import into desktop client (LTC,FTC,BTC)

Monitor a file's size
use "watch" instead of while-loops in these simple cases

Get a free shell account on a community server
Bash process substitution which curls the website 'hashbang.sh' and executes the shell script embedded in the page. This is obviously not the most secure way to run something like this, and we will scold you if you try. The smarter way would be: Download locally over SSL > curl https://hashbang.sh >> hashbang.sh Verify integrty with GPG (If available) > gpg --recv-keys 0xD2C4C74D8FAA96F5 > gpg --verify hashbang.sh Inspect source code > less hashbang.sh Run > chmod +x hashbang.sh > ./hashbang.sh

Print names of all video files encoded with h264

Burst a Single PDF Document into Single Pages and Report its Data to doc_data.txt
Require the pdftk package It ll split each page in your pdf file , into a new pdf file and report info on doc_data.txt


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