Commands tagged cmp (3)

  • This is just a slight alternative that wraps all of #7917 in a function that can be executed Show Sample Output


    2
    anagram(){ s(){ sed 's/./\n\0/g'<<<$1|sort;};cmp -s <(s $1) <(s $2)||echo -n "not ";echo anagram; }; anagram foobar farboo;
    bbbco · 2011-02-17 15:10:43 1
  • Compare the content of the files in the current directory with files of the same name in the duplicate directory. Pop Quiz: You have a duplicate of a directory with files of the same name that might differ. What do you do? You could use diff to compare the directories, but that's boring and it isn't as clever as find -print0 with xargs. Note: You must omit stderr redirect 2>/dev/null to see the list of missing files from DUPDIR, if any. Hint: Redirect stderr to a new file to produce a more readable list of files that are missing from DUPDIR. Warning: This doesn't tell you if DUPDIR contains files not found in the current directory so don't delete DUPDIR. Show Sample Output


    0
    find . -maxdepth 1 -mindepth 1 -print0 | xargs -0 -n 1 -I % cmp % /DUPDIR/% 2>/dev/null
    RiskNerd · 2018-07-08 02:25:57 0
  • Are the two strings anagrams of one another? sed splits up the strings into one character per line the result is sorted cmp compares the results Note: This is not pretty. I just wanted to see if I could do it in bash. Note: It uses fewer characters than the perl version :-)


    -3
    s(){ sed 's/./\n\0/g'<<<$1|sort;};cmp -s <(s foobar) <(s farboo)||echo -n "not ";echo anagram
    flatcap · 2011-02-17 12:42:45 2

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