Commands tagged bzip2 (9)

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Display HTTP-header using curl

find directory with most inodes/files
Find which directory in one filesystem that contains most inodes or files.

[vim] Clear trailing whitespace in file
% acts on every line in the file. \s matches spaces. \+ matches one or more occurrences of what's right behind it. Character '$' matches end-of-line.

Colorized JSON pretty printing
Uses pygmentize and python to create indented and colorized JSON output

Rename files in batch

Find if $b is in $a in bash
Find if $b is in $a in bash

Quick key/value display within /proc or /sys
Within /proc and /sys there are a lot of subdirectories, which carry pseudofiles with only one value as content. Instead of cat-ing all single files (which takes quite a time) or do a "cat *" (which makes it hard to find the filename/content relation), just grep recursively for . or use "grep . /blabla/*" (star instead of -r flag). For better readability you might also want to pipe the output to "column -t -s : ".

Email yourself a quick message
Usage: mailme message This is a useful function if you want to get notified about process completion or failure. e.g. $ mailme "process X completed"

Determine the version of a specific package with RPM
In this case, I'm getting the package version for 'redhat-release', but of course, this can be applied to any package installed on the filesystem. This is very handy in scripts that need to determine just the version of the package, without the package name and all the sed and grep hackery to get to the data you want. To find out all the support format strings that 'rpm --qf' supports: $ rpm --querytags

a simple bash one-liner to create php file and call php function


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