Commands tagged text-to-speech (7)

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Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

List installed deb packages by size

Dump dvd from a different machine onto this one.
You can use this to directly dump from machine A (with dvd drive) to machine B (without dvd drive) . I used this to copy dvd using my friend's machine to my netbook. Above command is to be issued on machine B. Advantages : 1) No wasting time dumping first to machine A and then copying to Machine B. 2) You dont need to use space on Machine A. In fact, this will work even when Machine A doesnt have enough hdd space to dump the DVD. Use -C ssh option on slow networks (enables compression). you can replace "dd if=/dev/dvd" with any ripping command as long as it spews the iso to stdout.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Copy a file using dd and watch its progress
This is a more accurate way to watch the progress of a dd process. The $DDPID=$! is needed so that you don't get the PID of the sleep. The sleep 1 is needed because in my testing at least, if you run kill -USR1 against dd too quickly, it will kill it off instead of display the status. So you need to wait a second, probably so that it can configure itself to trap the USR1 signal.

ls -hog --> a more compact ls -l
I often deal with long file names and the 'ls -l' command leaves very little room for file names. An alternative is to use the -h -o and -g flags (or together, -hog). * The -h flag produces human-readable file size (e.g. 91K instead of 92728) * The -o suppresses the owner column * The -g suppresses the group column Since I use to alias ll='ls -l', I now do alias ll='ls -hog'

escape any command aliases
e.g. if rm is aliased for 'rm -i', you can escape the alias by prepending a backslash: rm [file] # WILL prompt for confirmation per the alias \rm [file] # will NOT prompt for confirmation per the default behavior of the command

clone directory structure
dir1 and all its subdirs and subdirs of subdirs ... but *no files* will be copied to dir2 (not even symbolic links of files will be made). To preserve ownerships & permissions: $ cp -Rps dir1 dir2 Yes, you can do it with $ rsync -a --include '*/' --exclude '*' /path/to/source /path/to/dest too, but I didn't test if this can handle attributes correctly (experiment rsync command yourself with --dry-run switch to avoid harming your file system) You must be in the parent directory of dir1 while executing this command (place dir2 where you will), else soft links of files in dir2 will be made. I couldn't find how to avoid this "limitation" (yet). Playing with recursive unlink command loop maybe? PS. Bash will complain, but the job will be done.

Project your desktop using xrandr
HDMI-1 is the interface in the example, which can be obtained just by typing xrandr and surfing through the output. There are a hell lot of configurations that can be done but I prefer auto because it works in most cases. $ Lifesaver

mp3 streaming


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