Commands tagged large (2)

  • Find biggest files in a directory Show Sample Output


    1
    find . -printf '%.5m %10M %#9u %-9g %TY-%Tm-%Td+%Tr [%Y] %s %p\n'|sort -nrk8|head
    AskApache · 2014-12-10 23:48:20 1
  • This is for bash - make an alias - also a good blueprint for making aliases that take arguments to functions. If for Solaris use "-size +${1}000000c" to replace "-size +${1}M" Show Sample Output


    0
    alias big='BIG () { find . -size +${1}M -ls; }; BIG $1'
    greggster · 2011-03-10 06:33:00 1

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