Commands tagged large (5)

  • Find biggest files in a directory Show Sample Output


    1
    find . -printf '%.5m %10M %#9u %-9g %TY-%Tm-%Td+%Tr [%Y] %s %p\n'|sort -nrk8|head
    AskApache · 2014-12-10 23:48:20 1
  • This is for bash - make an alias - also a good blueprint for making aliases that take arguments to functions. If for Solaris use "-size +${1}000000c" to replace "-size +${1}M" Show Sample Output


    0
    alias big='BIG () { find . -size +${1}M -ls; }; BIG $1'
    greggster · 2011-03-10 06:33:00 1
  • Way more easy to understand for naive user. Just returns the biggest file with size.


    0
    find . -printf '%s %p\n'|sort -nr| head -1
    ranjha · 2014-12-14 15:40:56 0

  • 0
    du -k . | sort -rn | head -11
    b0wlninja · 2014-12-29 17:12:25 0
  • if you want to move with command mv large list of files than you would get following error /bin/mv: Argument list too long alternavite with exec: find /source/directory -mindepth 1 -maxdepth 1 -name '*' -exec mv {} /target/directory \; Show Sample Output


    0
    find /source/directory -mindepth 1 -maxdepth 1 -name '*' -print0 | xargs -0 mv -t /target/directory;
    aysadk · 2020-11-17 12:30:45 9

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Getting the last argument from the previous command

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uses the pkgfile command (part of the community repository), highly suggested.

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'hpc' in the shell - starts a maximum of n compute commands modulo n controlled in parallel, using make
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Find the package that installed a command

archlinux:Delete packages from pacman cache that are older than 7 days
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Determine command type (alias, keyword, function, builtin, or file)
Prints a string indicating whether a command is an alias, keyword, function, builtin, or file. I have used this in my BASH scripts to allow an external parameter to define which function to run, and ensure that it is a valid function that can indeed be run.


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