Commands tagged beautify (2)

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strips the first field of each line where the delimiter is the first ascii character

Set laptop display brightness
Run as root. Path may vary depending on laptop model and video card (this was tested on an Acer laptop with ATI HD3200 video). $ cat /proc/acpi/video/VGA/LCD/brightness to discover the possible values for your display.

Rename files in batch

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

Print every Nth line (to a maximum)
Thanks to knoppix5 for the idea :-) Print selected lines from a file or the output of a command. Usage: $ every NTH MAX [FILE] Print every NTH line (from the first MAX lines) of FILE. If FILE is omitted, stdin is used. The command simply passes the input to a sed script: $ sed -n -e "${2}q" -e "0~${1}p" ${3:-/dev/stdin} print no output $ sed -n quit after this many lines (controlled by the second parameter) $ -e "${2}q" print every NTH line (controlled by the first parameter) $ -e "0~${1}p" take input from $3 (if it exists) otherwise use /dev/stdin ${3:-/dev/stdin}

Simple Video Surveillance by email
This takes a picture (with the web cam) every 5 minutes, and send the picture to your e-mail. Some systems support mail -a "References: " so that all video surveillance emails are grouped in a single email thread. To keep your inbox clean, it is still possible to filter and move to trash video surveillance emails (and restore these emails only if you really get robbed!) For instance with Gmail, emails sent to [email protected] can be filtered with "Matches: DeliveredTo:[email protected]"

Short Information about loaded kernel modules

print all except first collumn

Query Wikipedia via console over DNS

'hpc' in the box - starts a maximum of n compute commands modulo n controlled in parallel
the block of the loop is useful whenever you have huge junks of similar jobs, e.g., convert high res images to thumbnails, and make usage out of all the SMP power on your compute box without flooding the system. note: c is used as counter and the random sleep $ r=`echo $RANDOM%5 |bc`; echo "sleep $r"; sleep $r is just used as a dummy command.


Stay in the loop…

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