Commands tagged synaptics (3)

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Determining the excat memory usages by certain PID
this command gives you the total number of memory usuage and open files by the perticuler PID.

create screencast (record text and audio simultaneously) using 'script' and 'arecord'
This shell function takes a single argument, which is used as the base name of the .wav, .timing and .session files created. To create a screencast: $ screencast test type and talk ... then type 'exit' or to exit the screencast. test.wav will contain the audio from your screencast. test.session will contain text and control characters needed to paint the screen test.timing will contain timing information needed to synch individual keystrokes in test.session with the audio. to play back: $ aplay test.wav & scriptreplay test.{timing,session} NOTE: because the shell function uses the variable "$!", and bash likes to expand '!' during history expansion, you will need to turn off bash's history before you enter the shell function. This can be achieved using the command $set +H

List all NPM global packages installed

Default value or argument
I used it for this function, which prints hashes: function liner { num_lines=${1:-42} echo printf %${num_lines}s|tr " " "#" echo } Note the colon-dash, instead of the usual colon-equals.

Show a prettified list of nearby wireless APs

Find usb device
I often use it to find recently added ou removed device, or using find in /dev, or anything similar. Just run the command, plug the device, and wait to see him and only him

List your MACs address

Remove specific versions of old kernels (Ubuntu/Debian)
If, for example, you want to remove all kernels and headers but the last three versions, you can't use one of that magic all-in-one "remove old stuff" commands. With this simple but elegant command you can remove a range of versions, or a list of versions with e.g. {14,16,20}.

Define shell variable HISTIGNORE so that comments (lines starting with #) appear in shell history
I was surprised to find that with RedHat bash, I could not find any comment lines (begining with #) in my bash shell history. Surprised because in Mageia Linux this works. It turns out that RedHat's bash will keep comment lines if in my .bashrc, I define: export HISTIGNORE=' cd "`*: PROMPT_COMMAND=?*?' Why have comment lines in shell history? It's a handy and convenient way to make proto-commands (to be completed later) and for storing brief text data that is searchable in shell history.

bash/ksh function: given a file, cd to the directory it lives
fcd : file change directory A bash function that takes a fully qualified file path and cd's into the directory where it lives. Useful on the commadline when you have a file name in a variable and you'd like to cd to the directory to RCS check it in or look at other files associated with it. Will run on any ksh, bash, likely sh, maybe zsh.


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