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Copy a file over SSH without SCP

Change proccess affinity.
Set the affinity of a process to a particular core(s). Arguments for processor include a comma separated list, or a range. (example: 1,2 or 0-3) You can use top in smp mode (Press 1) to see the changes to the affinity.

Display condensed log in a tree-like format.
Display condensed log in a tree-like format.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Twitter update from terminal (pok3's snipts ?)
Found it on snipt, pok3, is it yours? I put my user = m33600, the password and the status was my robot message: Settima robot message: ALARM ZONE 3 (sent via command line). Now bots may have their identity on twitter...

Make vim open in tabs by default (save to .profile)
I always add this to my .profile rc so I can do things like: "vim *.c" and the files are opened in tabs.

Print every Nth line
Sometimes commands give you too much feedback. Perhaps 1/100th might be enough. If so, every() is for you. $ my_verbose_command | every 100 will print every 100th line of output. Specifically, it will print lines 100, 200, 300, etc If you use a negative argument it will print the *first* of a block, $ my_verbose_command | every -100 It will print lines 1, 101, 201, 301, etc The function wraps up this useful sed snippet: $ ... | sed -n '0~100p' don't print anything by default $ sed -n starting at line 0, then every hundred lines ( ~100 ) print. $ '0~100p' There's also some bash magic to test if the number is negative: we want character 0, length 1, of variable N. $ ${N:0:1} If it *is* negative, strip off the first character ${N:1} is character 1 onwards (second actual character).

Scan Network for Rogue APs.
I've used this scan to sucessfully find many rogue APs on a very, very large network.

Copy from host 1 to host 2 through your host

Print stack trace of a core file without needing to enter gdb interactively
This does almost the same thing as the original, but it runs the full backtrace for _all_ the threads, which is pretty important when reporting a crash for a multithreaded software, since more often than not, the signal handler is executed in a different thread than the crash happened.


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