Commands tagged copy (34)

  • This command will copy a folder tree (keeping the parent folders) through ssh. It will: - compress the data - stream the compressed data through ssh - decompress the data on the local folder This command will take no additional space on the host machine (no need to create compressed tar files, transfer it and then delete it on the host). There is some situations (like mirroring a remote machine) where you simply cant wait for a huge time taking scp command or cant compress the data to a tarball on the host because of file system space limitation, so this command can do the job quite well. This command performs very well mainly when a lot of data is involved in the process. If you copying a low amount of data, use scp instead (easier to type) Show Sample Output


    12
    ssh <host> 'tar -cz /<folder>/<subfolder>' | tar -xvz
    polaco · 2009-11-10 20:06:47 4
  • Copies a dir structure without the files in it. Show Sample Output


    3
    structcp(){ ( mkdir -pv $2;f="$(realpath "$1")";t="$(realpath "$2")";cd "$f";find * -type d -exec mkdir -pv $t/{} \;);}
    frozenfire · 2009-08-23 11:26:38 2

  • 3
    for x in *.ex1; do mv "${x}" "${x%ex1}ex2"; done
    Tuirgin · 2009-08-12 17:45:08 2
  • If you want certain files out of a directory hierarchy, this will copy just the listed files, but will create the directory hierarchy in the new location ($DIR/)


    0
    cat files.txt | xargs tar -cv | tar -x -c $DIR/
    lingo · 2009-08-06 22:55:21 2

  • -3
    copy(){ cp -v "$1" "$2"&watch -n 1 'du -h "$1" "$2";printf "%s%%\n" $(echo `du -h "$2"|cut -dG -f1`/0.`du -h "$1"|cut -dG -f1`|bc)';}
    frozenfire · 2009-08-03 14:32:32 6
  • Find all corrupted jpeg in the current directory, find a file with the same name in a source directory hierarchy and copy it over the corrupted jpeg file. Convenient to run on a large bunch of jpeg files copied from an unsure medium. Needs the jpeginfo tool, found in the jpeginfo package (on debian at least).


    0
    for i in *jpg; do jpeginfo -c $i | grep -E "WARNING|ERROR" | cut -d " " -f 1 | xargs -I '{}' find /mnt/sourcerep -name {} -type f -print0 | xargs -0 -I '{}' cp -f {} ./ ; done
    vincentp · 2009-05-07 00:30:36 0
  • This command will copy files and directories from a remote machine to the local one. Ensure you are in the local directory you want to populate with the remote files before running the command. To copy a directory and it's contents, you could: ssh user@host "(cd /path/to/a/directory ; tar cvf - ./targetdir)" | tar xvf - This is especially useful on *nix'es that don't have 'scp' installed by default.


    1
    ssh user@host "(cd /path/to/remote/top/dir ; tar cvf - ./*)" | tar xvf -
    dopeman · 2009-03-31 13:08:45 3
  • If you have lots of remote hosts sitting "behind" an ssh proxy host, then there is a special-case use of "rsynch" that allows one to easily copy directories and files across the ssh proxy host, without having to do two explicit copies: the '-e' option allows for a replacement "rsh" command. We use this option to specify an "ssh" tunnel command, with the '-A' option that causes authentication agent requests to be forwarded back to the local host. If you have ssh set up correctly, the above command can be done without any passwords being entered.


    5
    rsync -avz -e 'ssh -A sshproxy ssh' srcdir remhost:dest/path/
    totoro · 2009-03-25 21:29:07 4
  • ./* is for copying files starting with - .[!.]* is for copying hidden files and avoiding copying files from the parent directory. ..?* is for copying files starting with .. (avoids the directory ..) /path/to/dir the path to the directory where the files should be copied Can also be used as a script. Input argument is /path/to/dir in tcsh, replace .[!.]* with .[^.]*


    1
    cp ./* .[!.]* ..?* /path/to/dir
    ako · 2009-03-16 13:27:36 0
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