Commands tagged calibre (5)

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pretend to be busy in office to enjoy a cup of coffee

Split huge file into DVD+R size chunks for burning
Real DVD+R size is 4700372992 bytes, but I round down a little to be safe. To reconstitute use cat. "cat file.img.gz.aa file.img.gz.ab ..... > file.img.gz"

Search for a word in less
Although less behaves more or less like vim in certain aspects, the vim regex for word boundaries (\< and \>) do not work in less. Instead, use \b to denote a word boundary. Therefore, if you want to search for, say, the word "exit", but do not want to search for exiting, exits, etc., then surround "exit" with \b. This is useful if you need to search for specific occurrences of a keyword or command. \b can also be used at just the beginning and end, if needed.

Network Folder Copy with Monitoring ( tar + nc + pv )
Transfer tar stream thru nc with pv montoiring taken from: http://www.catonmat.net/blog/unix-utilities-pipe-viewer/

Show the command line for a PID, converting nulls to spaces and a newline

mirrors directory to a ftp server
http://lftp.yar.ru/

Detect illegal access to kernel space, potentially useful for Meltdown detection
Based on capsule8 agent examples, not rigorously tested

Compare two files side-by-side
I found out about this from Unix Power Tools, and thought it was pretty useful. Use the -w option to change the width of the output, and the -s option to suppress lines that are the same in both files.

Share a screen session

Backup a file with a date-time stamp
$ buf myfile.txt This is useful when you are making small but frequent changes to a file. It keeps things organised and clear for another administrator to see what changed and at what time. An overview of changes can be deduced using a simple: $ ls -ltr


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