Commands tagged noise (3)

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Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

generate random tone

display typedefs, structs, unions and functions provided by a header file
will display typedefs, structs, unions and functions declared in 'stdio.h'(checkout _IO_FILE structure). It will be helpful if we want to know what a particular header file will offer to us. Command 'cpp' is GNU's C Preprocessor.

Play all files in the directory using MPlayer
Skip forward and back using the < and > keys. Display the file title with I.

Put a console clock in top right corner
This puts a clock in the top right of the terminal. This version doesn't use tput, but uses escape codes

Rename files in batch

Short URL to commandlinefu.com commands
Obviously replace the relevant parts as required. The following also work: $ lynx cmdl.in/efu/by-marcel -or- $ lynx cmdl.in/efu/view-9058

Define shell variable HISTIGNORE so that comments (lines starting with #) appear in shell history
I was surprised to find that with RedHat bash, I could not find any comment lines (begining with #) in my bash shell history. Surprised because in Mageia Linux this works. It turns out that RedHat's bash will keep comment lines if in my .bashrc, I define: export HISTIGNORE=' cd "`*: PROMPT_COMMAND=?*?' Why have comment lines in shell history? It's a handy and convenient way to make proto-commands (to be completed later) and for storing brief text data that is searchable in shell history.


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