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Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Sum file sizes

Find default gateway

Pick a random line from a file
This is from perldoc -q random.*line, which says: This has a significant advantage in space over reading the whole file in. You can find a proof of this method in The Art of Computer Programming, Volume 2, Section 3.4.2, by Donald E. Knuth. Who am I to argue with Don Knuth?

Sort netflow packet capture
Sort netflow packet capture by unique connections excluding source port.

shows history of logins on the server
perfect on a crashed system where you can't use commands like last. for investigation purposes wtmp file can be copied over to a different server and read with utmpdump

Change timestamp on a file
-a for access time, -m for modification time, -c do not create any files, -t timestamp

Get all possible problems from any log files
Using the grep command, retrieve all lines from any log files in /var/log/ that have one of the problem states

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

convert video format to youtube flv format


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