Commands tagged cronjob (13)

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which procs have $PATH_REGEX open?
faster than lsof by at least x2 on my box.

check open ports without netstat or lsof

Add a GPL license file to your project

Compare two directories
Output of this command is the difference of recursive file lists in two directories (very quick!). To view differences in content of files too, use the command submitted by mariusbutuc (very slow!): $ diff -rq path_to_dir1 path_to_dir2

Copy all shared libraries for a binary to directory
When working with jailed environments you need to copy all the shared libraries to your jail environment. This is done by running ldd on a binary which needs to run inside the jail. This command will use the output from ldd to automatically copy the shared libraries to a folder of your choice.

Quickest way to sort/display # of occurences

Get all IPs via ifconfig
works on Linux and Solaris. I think it will work on nearly all *nix-es

Poor man's nmap for a class C network from rfc1918
What do you do when nmap is not available and you want to see the hosts responding to an icmp echo request ? This one-liner will print all hosts responding with their ipv4 address.

Turns hidden applications transparent in the Mac OS X dock.
In Mac OS X, pressing Command+H will hide an application. While that application's windows vanish, there is no other visual feedback, meaning there is no immediate distinction between an application running with no windows open and a hidden application. This command turns hidden applications' icons transparent, providing a clear and obvious distinction. Change YES to NO to restore the previous functionality.

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.


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