Commands tagged progess meter (1)

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Easy file sharing from the command line using transfer.sh
Requires: curl xsel access to the internet(http://transfer.sh) This is an alias utilizing the transfer.sh service to make sharing files easier from the command line. I have modified the alias provided by transfer.sh to use xsel to copy the resulting URL to the clipboard. The full modified alias is as follows since commandlinefu only allows 255 characters: transfer() { if [ $# -eq 0 ]; then echo "No arguments specified. Usage:\necho transfer /tmp/test.md\ncat /tmp/test.md | transfer test.md"; return 1; fi if tty -s; then basefile=$(basename "$1" | sed -e 's/[^a-zA-Z0-9._-]/-/g'); curl --progress-bar --upload-file "$1" "https://transfer.sh/$basefile" |xsel --clipboard; else curl --progress-bar --upload-file "-" "https://transfer.sh/$1" |xsel --clipboard ; fi; xsel --clipboard; }

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Retrieve a random command from the commandlinefu.com API
Can be integrated into your .bashrc if you like. You'll probably want to grep out my name.

Print stack trace of a core file without needing to enter gdb interactively
This does almost the same thing as the original, but it runs the full backtrace for _all_ the threads, which is pretty important when reporting a crash for a multithreaded software, since more often than not, the signal handler is executed in a different thread than the crash happened.

Inverted cowsay
It's quite fun to invert text using "flip.pl" (ref: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2078323 ). Slightly more challenging is to flip a whole "cowsay". :-)

Generic shell function for modifying files in-place
Some commands (such as sed and perl) have options to support in-place editing of files, but many commands do not. This shell function enables any command to change files in place. See the sample output for many examples. The function uses plain sh syntax and works with any POSIX shell or derivative, including zsh and bash.

gets your public IP address

Send multiple attachments using mailx
If you're users have ever asked your script to email their reports in separate attachments instead of tar'ring them into one file, then you can use this. You'll need the mailx package of course. In Unix you'd want to add an additional parameter "-m" (uuencode foo.txt foo.txt; uuencode /etc/passwd passwd.txt)|mailx -m -s "Hooosa!" someone@cmdfu.com

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

Given $PID, print all child processes on stdout
Simpler.


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