Commands tagged repository (6)


  • 2
    curl -s https://api.github.com/users/<username>/repos?per_page=1000 | grep -oP '(?<="git_url": ").*(?="\,)'
    acavagni · 2019-12-11 20:55:13 15
  • This saves Subversion's log output as XML and then runs an XQuery over it. This is standard XQuery 1.0 and should therefore also work with other XQuery processors. I have tested it with Zorba (http://www.zorba-xquery.com). XQilla (http://xqilla.sourceforge.net) also does it, but you'd have to save the query to a file and then execute "xqilla filename.xq". The query first finds all distinct authors and then, for each author, sums up the number of paths they have changed in each commit. This accounts for commits of multiple changes at once. The indenting space in all lines from the second one seems to be due to a bug in Zorba. Show Sample Output


    1
    svn log -v --xml > log.xml; zorba -q 'let $log := doc("log.xml")/log/logentry return for $author in distinct-values($log/author) order by $author return concat($author, " ", sum(count($log[author=$author]/paths/path)), "&#xa;")' --serialize-text
    langec · 2013-03-22 11:17:10 0
  • attempts to delete all local branches. git will fail on any branches not fully merged into local master, so don't worry about losing work. git will return the names of any successfully deleted branches. Find those in the output with grep, then push null repositories to the corresponding names to your target remote. assumes: - your local and remote branches are identically named, and there's nothing extra in the remote branch that you still want - EDIT: you want to keep your local master branch


    0
    git branch | cut -c3- | grep -v "^master$" | while read line; do git branch -d $line; done | grep 'Deleted branch' | awk '{print $3;}' | while read line; do git push <target_remote> :$line; done
    gocoogs · 2011-08-13 16:58:34 2
  • This probably only works without modifications in RHEL/CentOS/Fedora. Show Sample Output


    0
    sed -n -e "/^\[/h; /priority *=/{ G; s/\n/ /; s/ity=/ity = /; p }" /etc/yum.repos.d/*.repo | sort -k3n
    eddieb · 2012-09-06 00:09:09 0

  • 0
    find .git/objects -type f -printf "%P\n" | sed s,/,, | while read object; do echo "=== $obj $(git cat-file -t $object) ==="; git cat-file -p $object; done
    hamador · 2013-10-02 09:09:00 0
  • This helps me determine which repo I want to use for downloading ISO files Show Sample Output


    0
    cat repos.txt | while read line; do echo $line | cut -d"/" -f 3 | fping -e ;done
    rawm · 2015-02-17 06:34:07 0

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