Commands tagged recently changed (3)

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Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

hard disk information - Model/serial no.
Get the hard disk information with out shutting down and opening the system. It gives information on model no., serial no., cylinders/heads/sectors, and the supported features of the hard disk.

a shell function to print a ruler the width of the terminal window.
A similar version for Bash that doesn't require cut and shortens the function in a few places. And it uses local variables. (similar to a version by eightmillion in a comment on the another version)

Cheap iftop
Shows updated status in a terminal window for connections to port '80' in a human-friendly form. Use 'watch -n1' to update every second, and 'watch -d' to highlight changes between updates. If you wish for status updates on a port other than '80', always remember to put a space afterwards so that ":80" will not match ":8080".

Replace spaces in filenames with underscores
I realize there's a few of these out there, but none exactly in this form, which seems the cleanest to me

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Backup sda5 partition to ftp ( using pipes and gziped backup )

Grep colorized
Highlights the search pattern in red.

Create test images
Useful to test programs and webpages.

Binary Clock
Binary clock with separate H:M:S.


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