Commands tagged globbing (1)

  • This command will give you the same list of files as "find /etc/ -name '*killall' | xargs ls -l". In a simpler format just do 'ls /etc/**/file'. It uses shell globbing, so it will also work with other commands, like "cp /etc/**/sshd sshd_backup". Show Sample Output


    9
    ls -l /etc/**/*killall
    xeor · 2011-08-30 05:57:49 0

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