Commands tagged msf (3)

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Multi-thread any command
For instance: $ find . -type f -name '*.wav' -print0 |xargs -0 -P 3 -n 1 flac -V8 will encode all .wav files into FLAC in parallel. Explanation of xargs flags: -P [max-procs]: Max number of invocations to run at once. Set to 0 to run all at once [potentially dangerous re: excessive RAM usage]. -n [max-args]: Max number of arguments from the list to send to each invocation. -0: Stdin is a null-terminated list. I use xargs to build parallel-processing frameworks into my scripts like the one here: http://pastebin.com/1GvcifYa

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Replace all tabs with spaces in an application
Note that this assumes the application is an SVN checkout and so we have to throw away all the .svn files before making the substitution.

Convert all MySQL tables and fields to UTF8
This loops through all tables and changes their collations to UTF8. You should backup beforehand though in case some data is lost in the process.

Rename files in batch

Get line number 12 (or n) from a file
Extracts only file number 12 from file. It's meant for text files. Replace 12 with the number you want. First line starts at 1 not 0. We use q on next line so doesn't process any line more.

netstat with group by ip adress

Show directories in the PATH, one per line
The output of "echo $PATH" is hard to read, this is much easier. The parentheses ensure that the change to the input field separator (IFS) only happens the the sub shell and not affecting the current shell.

Move cursor to end of line

Analyze awk fields
Breaks down and numbers each line and it's fields. This is really useful when you are going to parse something with awk but aren't sure exactly where to start.


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