Commands tagged multitail (1)

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Show the PATH, one directory per line
This is useful for examining the path.

Replace duplicate files by hardlinks

sort a JSON blob
For situations where you keep JSON in a VCS and you want your diffs to be sane, such as within a Chef configuration repo.

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

Colored SVN diff
Simple way to achieve a colored SVN diff

Perform a branching conditional
This will perform one of two blocks of code, depending on the condition of the first. Essentially is a bash terniary operator. To tell if a machine is up: $ ping -c1 machine { echo succes;} || { echo failed; } Because of the bash { } block operators, you can have multiple commands $ ping -c1 machine && { echo success;log-timestamp.sh }|| { echo failed; email-admin.sh; } Tips: Remember, the { } operators are treated by bash as a reserved word: as such, they need a space on either side. If you have a command that can fail at the end of the true block, consider ending said block with 'false' to prevent accidental execution

Copy specific files recursively using the same tree organization.
This command has been used to overwrite corrupted "entries" files of a corrupted subversion working copy. Note the --files-from input format.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Check if *hardware* is 32bit or 64bit
CPU flags: rm --> 16-bit processor (real mode) tm --> 32-bit processor (? mode) lm --> 64-bit processor (long mode)

delete files containing matching text
-r recursively -Z zero byte after each file name instead of the usual newline -l only filenames


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