Commands tagged repeat (2)

  • The example runs 'puppet' in a loop for 10 times, but exits the loop before if it returns 0 (that means "no changes on last run" for puppet).


    0
    for times in $(seq 10) ; do puppet agent -t && break ; done
    funollet · 2013-04-03 14:24:36 0
  • In this case it runs the command 'curl localhost:3000/site/sha' waiting the amount of time in sleep, ie: 1 second between runs, appending each run to the console. This works well for any command where the output is less than your line width This is unlike watch, because watch always clears the display. Show Sample Output


    1
    while true ; do echo -n "`date`";curl localhost:3000/site/sha;echo -e;sleep 1; done
    donnoman · 2011-10-14 21:00:41 0

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