Commands tagged unix (65)

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Get all upgradable deb packages in a single line
Works for debian and ubuntu based distros.

Print every Nth line
Sometimes commands give you too much feedback. Perhaps 1/100th might be enough. If so, every() is for you. $ my_verbose_command | every 100 will print every 100th line of output. Specifically, it will print lines 100, 200, 300, etc If you use a negative argument it will print the *first* of a block, $ my_verbose_command | every -100 It will print lines 1, 101, 201, 301, etc The function wraps up this useful sed snippet: $ ... | sed -n '0~100p' don't print anything by default $ sed -n starting at line 0, then every hundred lines ( ~100 ) print. $ '0~100p' There's also some bash magic to test if the number is negative: we want character 0, length 1, of variable N. $ ${N:0:1} If it *is* negative, strip off the first character ${N:1} is character 1 onwards (second actual character).

Sort a character string
Sorts a character string, using common shell commands.

open path with your default program (on Linux/*BSD)
open [path] in the default program, regardless of which Desktop Environment you use (KDE, GNOME, etc.) Works on all "freedesktop.org" compatible desktop environments

find matching wholename example

Cd Deluxe - improved cd command for *nix and windows
Hello, Take a look at this free cd replacement - "cd deluxe" a.k.a. "cdd". It is a free open source (GPLv3) application that I have created. As a long time command line enthusiast I have always been frustrated with the limited capabilities of the humble "cd" command. Especially since that is the most commonly used command line utility! See http://www.plan10.com/cdd for the full details and download information. Thanks, -Mike

Change/Modify timestamp interactively

Test file system performance
You need bonnie++ package for this. More detail than a simple hdparm -t /dev/sda would give you. the -d is the directory where it performs writes/reads for example I use /tmp/scratch with 777 permissions Bonnie++ benchmarks three things: data read and write speed, number of seeks that can be performed per second, and number of file metadata operations that can be performed per second.

Find removed files still in use via /proc
Oracle DBA remove some logfiles which are still open by the database and he is complaining the space has not been reclaimed? Use the above command to find out what PID needs to be stopped. Or alternatively recover the file via: $ cp /proc/pid/fd/filehandle /new/file.txt

command! -nargs=1 Vs vs <args>
Because entering ':' requires that you press shift, sometimes common command-line / mini-buffer commands will be capitalized by accident.


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