Commands tagged Amazon (3)

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add static arp entry to default gateway, arp poison protection

Greets the user appropriately

set your screensaver as your desktop background MAC OSX

List all files modified by a command
Often you run a command, but afterwards you're not quite sure what it did. By adding this prefix/suffix around [COMMAND], you can list any files that were modified. . Take a nanosecond timestamp: YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS.NNNNNNNNN $ date "+%F %T.%N" . Find any files that have been modified since that timestamp: $ find . -newermt "$D" . This command currently only searches below the current directory. If you want to look elsewhere change the find parameter, e.g. $ find /var/log . -newermt "$D"

Monitor a file with tail with timestamps added

Remove all .svn folders

Generate soothing noise
Substitute 'brown' with 'pink' or 'white' according to your taste. I put this on my headphones when I'm working in an "open concept" office, where there are always three to five conversations going in earshot, or if I'm working somewhere it is "rude" of me to tell a person to turn off their cubicle radio.

Selecting a random file/folder of a folder
Also looks in subfolders

Blank/erase a DVD-RW

Create a bash script from last commands
In order to write bash-scripts, I often do the task manually to see how it works. I type ### at the start of my session. The function fetches the commands from the last occurrence of '###', excluding the function call. You could prefix this with a here-document to have a proper script-header. Delete some lines, add a few variables and a loop, and you're ready to go. This function could probably be much shorter...


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