Commands tagged lxc (3)

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lazy SQL QUERYING
alias for psql command line; works similar for Oracles sqlplus commandline interface. if you do not provide stdin you will end up in the db shell.

Find all active ip's in a subnet

A fun thing to do with ram is actually open it up and take a peek. This command will show you all the string (plain text) values in ram

A simple X11 tea timer
wrapping the snippet in $( )& puts the whole thing in the background so you don't tie up your login session.

Paste command output to www.pastehtml.com in txt format.
paste(){ curl -s -S --data-urlencode "txt=$([email protected])" "http://pastehtml.com/upload/create?input_type=txt&result=address";echo;}

get newest jpg picture in a folder
search the newest *.jpg in the directory an make a copy to newest.jpg. Just change the extension to search other files. This is usefull eg. if your webcam saves all pictures in a folder and you like the put the last one on your homepage. This works even in a directory with 10000 pictures.

Display information sent by browser
Have netcat listen on port 8000, point browser to http://localhost:8000/ and you see the information sent. netcat terminates as soon as your browser disconnects. I tested this command on my Fedora box but linuxrawkstar pointed out that he needs to use $ nc -l -p 8000 instead. This depends on the netcat version you use. The additional '-p' is required by GNU netcat that for example is used by Debian but not by the OpenBSD netcat port used by my Fedora system.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Generate a (compressed) pdf from images
use imagemagik convert

Prepend a text to a file.
The original command is great, but I often want to prepend to every line.


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