Commands tagged default (3)

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

commandline dictionary
Note: 1) Replace 'wonder' with any word you looking the meaning for in the above example 2) Need to install these packages: wordnet & wordnet-base (latter should be automatically installed because of dependency) 3) Combined size of packages is about 30MB on my old ubuntu system (I find it worth it)

compare two Microsoft Word documents
http://meld.sourceforge.net/ http://www.winfield.demon.nl/

Convert a Nero Image File to ISO
This line removes the 300k header from a Nero image file converting it to ISO format

Sum file sizes

skip broken piece of a loop but not exit the loop entirely
useful for loops like for i in $(cat list_of_servers); do ssh -q $i hostname; done if there is an unreachable server, you can just press ctrl + \ to skip that server and continue on with the loop

List all execs in $PATH, usefull for grepping the resulting list
While it seems (to me at least) a little counter-intuitive to filter on name first, this requires less work for find, as it allows it to immediately discount any files that do not match the name directly from the directory listing on disk. Querying against file attributes requires reading the file attributes, which is performed for all files matching any name based predicates.

List all authors of a particular git project
Gets the authors, sorts by number of commits (as a vague way of estimating how much of the project is their work, i.e. the higher in the list, the more they've done) and then outputs the results.

Buffer in order to avoir mistakes with redirections that empty your files
A common mistake in Bash is to write command-line where there's command a reading a file and whose result is redirected to that file. It can be easily avoided because of : 1) warnings "-bash: file.txt: cannot overwrite existing file" 2) options (often "-i") that let the command directly modify the file but I like to have that small function that does the trick by waiting for the first command to end before trying to write into the file. Lots of things could probably done in a better way, if you know one...

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Show what PID is listening on port 80 on Linux


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: