Commands tagged cpu usage (9)

  • I needed a way to search all files in a web directory that contained a certain string, and replace that string with another string. In the example, I am searching for "askapache" and replacing that string with "htaccess". I wanted this to happen as a cron job, and it was important that this happened as fast as possible while at the same time not hogging the CPU since the machine is a server. So this script uses the nice command to run the sh shell with the command, which makes the whole thing run with priority 19, meaning it won't hog CPU processing. And the -P5 option to the xargs command means it will run 5 separate grep and sed processes simultaneously, so this is much much faster than running a single grep or sed. You may want to do -P0 which is unlimited if you aren't worried about too many processes or if you don't have to deal with process killers in the bg. Also, the -m1 command to grep means stop grepping this file for matches after the first match, which also saves time. Show Sample Output


    10
    sh -c 'S=askapache R=htaccess; find . -mount -type f|xargs -P5 -iFF grep -l -m1 "$S" FF|xargs -P5 -iFF sed -i -e "s%${S}%${R}%g" FF'
    AskApache · 2009-10-02 05:03:10 0
  • For each cpu set mask and then monitor your cpu infos. Temp,load avg. etc. For example for 2nd cpu or 2nd core taskset 0x00000002 yes > /dev/null & For example for 3rd cpu or 3rd core taskset 0x00000004 yes > /dev/null & For example for 4th cpu or 4th core taskset 0x00000008 yes > /dev/null & Monitor your cpu temp with this command if you want watch -n1 "acpi -t" Load avg. from top command top kerim@bayner.com http://www.bayner.com/


    8
    taskset 0x00000001 yes > /dev/null &
    kerim · 2011-04-03 07:23:53 0

  • 4
    ps -ef --sort=-%cpu
    aguslr · 2011-10-14 21:57:51 0
  • I've wanted this for a long time, finally just sat down and came up with it. This shows you the sorted output of ps in a pretty format perfect for cron or startup scripts. You can sort by changing the k -vsz to k -pmem for example to sort by memory instead. If you want a function, here's one from my http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html aa_top_ps(){ local T N=${1:-10};T=${2:-vsz}; ps wwo pid,user,group,vsize:8,size:8,sz:6,rss:6,pmem:7,pcpu:7,time:7,wchan,sched=,stat,flags,comm,args k -${T} -A|sed -u "/^ *PID/d;${N}q"; } Show Sample Output


    2
    command ps wwo pid,user,group,vsize:8,size:8,sz:6,rss:6,pmem:7,pcpu:7,time:7,wchan,sched=,stat,flags,comm,args k -vsz -A|sed -u '/^ *PID/d;10q'
    AskApache · 2010-05-18 18:41:38 1
  • Watch the temperatures of your CPU cores in real time at the command line. Press CONTROL+C to end. GORY DETAILS: Your computer needs to support sensors (many laptops, for example, do not). You'll need to install the lm-sensors package if it isn't already installed. And it helps to run the `sensors-detect` command to set up your sensor kernel modules first. At the very end of the sensors-detect interactive shell prompt, answer YES to add the new lines to the list of kernel modules loaded at boot. Show Sample Output


    1
    while :; do sensors|grep ^Core|while read x; do printf '% .23s\n' "$x"; done; sleep 1 && clear; done;
    linuxrawkstar · 2011-04-20 06:41:57 2
  • Bash has a built-in time command which provides less functionality than the real time command. Thus we reference /usr/bin/time directly. Since the command isn't very easy to remember you could alias it to something like "cputime" or even just "time". Show Sample Output


    1
    /usr/bin/time -f "\ntime\t%E\nCPU\t%P\nRAM\t%Mk" <command>
    Negate · 2018-10-27 03:11:51 0
  • Monitoring system in one line : DISK : disk space MEM: memory ( mem , swap, Total) CPU : all information about cpu activity LOAD : load average Show Sample Output


    0
    echo "DISK:";df -Pl | grep -v "Filesystem" | awk '{print $5,$6}' ; echo "MEM:" ; free -mto | awk '{ print $1,$2,$3,$4 }'; echo "CPU:"; top -b -d1 -n1 | grep Cpu | awk '{print $2,$3,$4,$5,$6,$7,$8,$9}';echo "LOAD:"; cat /proc/loadavg
    injez · 2014-09-29 12:43:52 0
  • This is a alternate command I like to use instead of TOP or HTOP to see what are the processes which are taking up the most memory on a system. It shows the username, process ID, CPU usage, Memory usage, thread ID, Number of threads associated with parent process, Resident Set Size, Virtual Memory Size, start time of the process, and command arguments. Then it's sorted by memory and showing the top 10 with head. This of course can be changed to suit you needs. I have a small system which is why Firefox is taking so much resources. Show Sample Output


    0
    watch -n .8 'ps -eaLo uname,pid,pcpu,pmem,lwp,nlwp,rss,vsz,start_time,args --sort -pmem| head -10'
    ubercoo · 2016-05-11 01:05:53 0

  • -1
    Limit kernel compilation load
    rubenmoran · 2012-11-12 18:04:40 0

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live ssh network throughput test
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scp a good script from host A which has no public access to host C, but with a hop by host B
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Download Youtube Playlist
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