Commands tagged file size (8)

  • Here's a way to wait for a file (a download, a logfile, etc) to stop changing, then do something. As written it will just return to the prompt, but you could add a "; echo DONE" or whatever at the end. This just compares the full output of "ls" every 10 seconds, and keeps going as long as that output has changed since the last interval. If the file is being appended to, the size will change, and if it's being modified without growing, the timestamp from the "--full-time" option will have changed. The output of just "ls -l" isn't sufficient since by default it doesn't show seconds, just minutes. Waiting for a file to stop changing is not a very elegant or reliable way to measure that some process is finished - if you know the process ID there are much better ways. This method will also give a false positive if the changes to the target file are delayed longer than the sleep interval for any reason (network timeouts, etc). But sometimes the process that is writing the file doesn't exit, rather it continues on doing something else, so this approach can be useful if you understand its limitations.


    1
    while [ "$(ls -l --full-time TargetFile)" != "$a" ] ; do a=$(ls -l --full-time TargetFile); sleep 10; done
    dmmst19 · 2015-05-09 03:19:49 1

  • 1
    find . -type f -size +100M
    chikondi · 2013-02-07 11:58:10 0
  • You can simply run "largest", and list the top 10 files/directories in ./, or you can pass two parameters, the first being the directory, the 2nd being the limit of files to display. Best off putting this in your bashrc or bash_profile file Show Sample Output


    1
    largest() { dir=${1:-"./"}; count=${2:-"10"}; echo "Getting top $count largest files in $dir"; du -sx "$dir/"* | sort -nk 1 | tail -n $count | cut -f2 | xargs -I file du -shx file; }
    jhyland87 · 2013-01-21 09:45:21 0
  • "-exec" ftw.


    0
    find . -type f -exec du -sh {} + | sort -hr | head
    mrfixit42 · 2012-08-03 04:24:36 0
  • This requires a version of GNU find that supports the -exec {} + action, but it seems more straightforward than the versions already posted. Show Sample Output


    0
    find . -type f -exec ls -shS {} + | head -10
    erichamion · 2012-07-28 17:21:46 0

  • 9
    find . -type f -print0 | xargs -0 du -h | sort -hr | head -10
    netaxiz · 2012-06-30 10:03:31 1

  • 2
    find . -type f -print0 | xargs -0 du -h | sort -hr | head
    mesuutt · 2012-06-29 12:43:06 3
  • This command does a basic find with size. It also improves the printout given (more clearer then default) Adjusting the ./ will alter the path. Adjusting the "-size +100000k" will specify the size to search for. Show Sample Output


    0
    find ./ -type f -size +100000k -exec ls -lh {} \; 2>/dev/null| awk '{ print $8 " : " $5}'
    Goez · 2012-01-21 04:19:35 0

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