Commands tagged FAT (2)

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Determine if a command is in your $PATH using POSIX
it is generally advised to avoid using which(1) whenever possible. which(1) is usually a csh(1) script, or sometimes a compiled binary. It's output is highly variable from operating system to operating system, so platform independent scripts could become quite complicated with the logic. On HP-UX 10.20, for example, it prints "no bash in /path /path /path ..."; on OpenBSD 4.1, it prints "bash: Command not found."; on Debian (3.1 through 5.0 at least) and SuSE, it prints nothing at all; on Red Hat 5.2, it prints "which: no bash in (/path:/path:...)"; on Red Hat 6.2, it writes the same message, but on standard error instead of standard output; and on Gentoo, it writes something on stderr. And given all these differences, it's still variable based on your shell. This is why POSIX is king. See http://mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/081 for more ways on avoiding which(1).

find listening ports by pid
change 24073 to your pid

Check if the LHC has destroyed the world
This says if the LHC has destroyed the world. Run it in a loop to monitor the state of Earth. Might not work reliable, if the world has actually been destroyed.

underscore to camelCase

reclaim your window titlebars (in ubuntu lucid)

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

Lookup hostname for IP address

Test disk I/O
Especially useful to gauge the performance of a VPS.

ROT13 whole file in vim.
gg puts the cursor at the begin g? ROT13 until the next mov G the EOF

Get the list of local files that changed since their last upload in an S3 bucket
Can be useful to granulary flush files in a CDN after they've been changed in the S3 bucket.


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