Commands tagged ssh-copy-id (6)

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

Command to keep an SSH connection open
This runs the uptime command every 30 seconds to avoid an SSH connection dropping due to inactivity. Granted there are better ways of solving this problem but this is sometimes the right tool for the job.

Tricky implementation of two-dimensional array in Bash.
Since Bash doesn't support two-dimensional arrays, you can limit your columns length by some big enough constant value ( in this example 100 ) and then index the array with i and j, or maybe write your own get() and set() methods to index the array properly like I implemented for example ( see Sample output ). For example for i=0 and j=0...99 you'll pick up one of 100 elements in the range [0,99] in the one-dimensional array. For i=1 and j=0...99 you'll pick up one of 100 elements in the range [100,199]. And so on. Be careful when using this, and remember that in fact you are always using one-dimensional array.

list files recursively by size

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Watch several log files in a single window
It works like a "tail -f" on several files. Use the number keys 0-9 to set a baseline in the numbered window. Pressing "b" let you scroll back in one of the windows.

Check your bash shell for vulnerability to the ShellShock exploit
If this command prints 'x' then your shell is vulnerable. Null output confirms that you are protected. Further reading: http://allanmcrae.com/2014/09/shellshock-and-arch-linux/

clear current line

I hate `echo X | Y`
apart from not being generalisable to all shells, `Y <<< X` seems nicer to me than `echo X | Y`, e.g. $ <<< lol cat; it reads easier, you type less, and it also looks cool

Get file access control list

Open (in vim) all modified files in a git repository
For editing files added to the index: $ vim `git diff --name-only --cached` To edit all changed files: $ vim `git diff --name-only HEAD` To edit changed files matching glob: $ vim `git diff --name-only -- '*.html'` If the commands needs to support filenames with whitespace, it gets a bit hacky (see http://superuser.com/questions/336016/invoking-vi-through-find-xargs-breaks-my-terminal-why for the reason): $ git diff --name-only -z | xargs -0 bash -c '


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: