Commands tagged kickstart (1)

  • Rather then editing the /etc/sysconfig/iptables file, or during a kickstart doing some awk/sed magic, easily add a rule in the correct place within iptables


    1
    REJECT_RULE_NO=$(iptables -L RH-Firewall-1-INPUT --line-numbers | grep 'REJECT' | awk '{print $1}');/sbin/iptables -I RH-Firewall-1-INPUT $REJECT_RULE_NO -m state --state NEW -m tcp -p tcp --dport 80 -j ACCEPT -m comment --comment "Permit HTTP Service"
    ajmckee · 2012-02-02 12:21:06 0

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