Commands tagged pax-utils (2)

  • This provides a list of shared object names (sonames) that are exported by a given tree. This is usually useful to make sure that a given required dependency (NEEDED entry) is present in a firmware image tree. The shorter (usable) version for it would be scanelf -RBSq -F "+S#f" But I used the verbose parameters in the command above, for explanation. Show Sample Output


    1
    scanelf --nobanner --recursive --quiet --soname --format "+S#f"
    Flameeyes · 2012-03-29 18:26:25 0
  • This works in combination with http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/10496/identify-exported-sonames-in-a-path as it reports the NEEDED entries present in the files within a given path. You can then compare it with the libraries that are exported to make sure that, when cross-building a firmware image, you're not bringing in dependencies from the build host. The short version of it as can be seen in the same output is scanelf -RBnq -F "+n#f" $1 | tr ',' '\n' | sort -u Show Sample Output


    1
    scanelf --nobanner --recursive --quiet --needed --format "+n#F" $1 | tr ',' '\n' | sort -u
    Flameeyes · 2012-03-29 18:30:45 0

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