Commands tagged automation (6)

  • This is a (last resort) way to automate applications that provide no other ways for automation, it would send 'Hello world' to the currently active window. See the manpage (and the -text and -window entries) for how to send special characters and target specific windows. An example: Using xwininfo, I get the id of my XPlanet background window: [email protected]:19:51:0:~> xwininfo xwininfo: Please select the window about which you would like information by clicking the mouse in that window. xwininfo: Window id: 0x3600001 "Xplanet 1.2.0" Absolute upper-left X: 0 (..etc..) Now I use xvkbd to tell it to close itself: xvkbd -xsendevent -window 0x3600001 -text "Q" Obviously, the best way is to put these commands in a shellscript - just make sure to include a short sleep (sleep .1 should suffice) after each xvkbd call, or some programs will become confused.


    15
    xvkbd -xsendevent -text "Hello world"
    Alanceil · 2009-03-20 18:58:05 1
  • Referring to the original post, if you are using $! then that means the process is a child of the current shell, so you can just use `wait $!`. If you are trying to wait for a process created outside of the current shell, then the loop on `kill -0 $PID` is good; although, you can't get the exit status of the process.


    3
    wait $!
    noahspurrier · 2010-06-07 21:56:36 0
  • This one-liner is for cron jobs that need to provide some basic information about a filesystem and the time it takes to complete the operation. You can swap out the di command for df or du if that's your thing. The |& redirections the stderr and stdout to the mail command. How to configure the variables. TOFSCK=/path/to/mount FSCKDEV=/dev/path/device or FSCKDEV=`grep $TOFSCK /proc/mounts | cut -f1 -d" "` MAILSUB="weekly file system check $TOFSCK " Show Sample Output


    1
    ( di $TOFSCK -h ; /bin/umount $TOFSCK ; time /sbin/e2fsck -y -f -v $FSCKDEV ; /bin/mount $TOFSCK ) |& /bin/mail $MAILTO -s "$MAILSUB"
    px · 2010-10-24 00:35:23 1
  • If you really _must_ use a loop, this is better than parsing the output of 'ps': PID=$! ;while kill -0 $PID &>/dev/null; do sleep 1; done kill -0 $PID returns 0 if the process still exists; otherwise 1


    0
    wait
    bhepple · 2010-01-15 04:03:11 2
  • Use this command to execute the contents of http://www.example.com/automation/remotescript.sh in the local environment. The parameters are optional. Alterrnatives to wget: CURL: curl -s http://www.example.com/automation/remotescript.sh | bash /dev/stdin param1 param2 W3M: w3m -dump http://www.example.com/automation/remotescript.sh | bash /dev/stdin [param1] [param2] LYNX: lynx -source http://www.example.com/automation/remotescript.sh | bash /dev/stdin [param1] [param2]


    0
    wget -q -O - http://www.example.com/automation/remotescript.sh | bash /dev/stdin parameter1 parameter2
    paulera · 2015-02-16 16:55:09 5
  • The '[r]' is to avoid grep from grepping itself. (interchange 'r' by the appropriate letter) Here is an example that I use a lot (as root or halt will not work): while (ps -ef | grep [w]get); do sleep 10; done; sleep 60; halt I add the 'sleep 60' command just in case something went wrong; so that I have time to cancel. Very useful if you are going to bed while downloading something and do not want your computer running all night.


    -2
    while (ps -ef | grep [r]unning_program_name); do sleep 10; done; command_to_execute
    m_a_xim · 2010-01-14 16:26:34 0

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Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

Get length of current playlist in xmms2

Encoding from AVI to MPEG format
http://www.mplayerhq.hu/DOCS/HTML/en/menc-feat-mpeg.html MEncoder can create MPEG (MPEG-PS) format output files. Usually, when you are using MPEG-1 or MPEG-2 video, it is because you are encoding for a constrained format such as SVCD, VCD, or DVD. To change MEncoder's output file format, use the -of mpeg option. Creating an MPEG-1 file suitable to be played on systems with minimal multimedia support, such as default Windows installs: $ mencoder input.avi -of mpeg -mpegopts format=mpeg1:tsaf:muxrate=2000 \ -o output.mpg -oac lavc -lavcopts acodec=mp2:abitrate=224 -ovc lavc \ -lavcopts vcodec=mpeg1video:vbitrate=1152:keyint=15:mbd=2:aspect=4/3

Detect illegal access to kernel space, potentially useful for Meltdown detection
Based on capsule8 agent examples, not rigorously tested

Shutdown a Windows machine from Linux
This will issue a shutdown command to the Windows machine. username must be an administrator on the Windows machine. Requires samba-common package installed. Other relevant commands are: net rpc shutdown -r : reboot the Windows machine net rpc abortshutdown : abort shutdown of the Windows machine Type: net rpc to show all relevant commands

How to establish a remote Gnu screen session that you can re-connect to
Long before tabbed terminals existed, people have been using Gnu screen to open many shells in a single text terminal. Combined with ssh, it gives you the ability to have many open shells with a single remote connection using the above options. If you detach with "Ctrl-a d" or if the ssh session is accidentally terminated, all processes running in your remote shells remain undisturbed, ready for you to reconnect. Other useful screen commands are "Ctrl-a c" (open new shell) and "Ctrl-a a" (alternate between shells). Read this quick reference for more screen commands: http://aperiodic.net/screen/quick_reference

kill some process (same as others) but parsing to a variable
Kills a process matching program. I suggest using $ pgrep -fl program to avoid over-killings Nice the following: kills all bash process owned by guest $ pkill -9 -f bash -u guest

Show drive names next to their full serial number (and disk info)
As of this writing, this requires a fairly recent version of util-linux, but is much simpler than the previous alternatives. Basically, lsblk gives a nice, human readable interface to all the blkid stuff. (Of course, I wouldn't recommend this if you're going to be parsing the output.) This command takes all the fun out of the previous nifty pipelines, but I felt I ought to at least mention it as an alternative since it is the most practical.


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