Commands tagged mysqlbinlog (2)

  • shows number of mysql bin log events (which are mysql server events) per minute, useful to check stress times postmortem Show Sample Output


    1
    mysqlbinlog <logfiles> | grep exec | grep end_log_pos | cut -d' ' -f2- | cut -d: -f-2 | uniq -c
    theist · 2012-05-30 09:42:21 4
  • Shows sorted by query time, the headers of mysqlbinlog entries. Then is easy to locate the heavier events on the raw log dump Show Sample Output


    0
    mysqlbinlog <logfiles> | grep exec | grep end_log_pos | grep -v exec_time=0 | sed 's/^\(.*exec_time=\([0-9]\+\).*\)/\2 - \1 /' | sort -n
    theist · 2012-05-30 09:38:02 2

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Print a row of 50 hyphens

convert strings toupper/tolower with tr

Remove duplicate rows of an un-sorted file based on a single column
$F[0] filters using first word. $F[1] - 2nd, and so on.

Duplicating service runlevel configurations from one server to another.
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Show drive names next to their full serial number (and disk info)
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geoip information
A function that takes a domain name as an argument

find an unused unprivileged TCP port
Some commands (such as netcat) have a port option but how can you know which ports are unused?

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Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Collect a lot of icons from /usr/share/icons (may overwrite some, and complain a bit)
Today I needed to choose an icon for an app. My simpler way: put all of /usr/share/icons in myicons folder and brows'em with nautilus. Then rm -r 'ed the entire dir.


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