Commands tagged brute force (1)

  • Show the number of failed tries of login per account. If the user does not exist it is marked with *. Show Sample Output


    24
    sudo zcat /var/log/auth.log.*.gz | awk '/Failed password/&&!/for invalid user/{a[$9]++}/Failed password for invalid user/{a["*" $11]++}END{for (i in a) printf "%6s\t%s\n", a[i], i|"sort -n"}'
    point_to_null · 2009-03-21 06:41:59 2

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

Search for packages, ranked by popularity
This will take the packages matching a given `apt-cache search` query (a collection of AND'd words or regexps) and tell you how popular they are. This is particularly nice for those times you have to figure out which solution to use for e.g. a PDF reader or a VNC client. Substitute "ubuntu.com" for "debian.org" if you want this to use Ubuntu's data instead. Everything else will work perfectly.

Check if *hardware* is 32bit or 64bit
This command tell you if your hardware is 32 or 64 bits even if you install a 32bits OS on a 64 bits hardware. If your distro don't support the -q switch, try doing : $ grep &>/dev/null '\' /proc/cpuinfo && echo 64 bits || echo 32 bits

Mount directories in different locations
Like symlinked directories, you can mount a directory at a different location. For example mounting a directory from one location in to the http root without having to make your program follow symlinks or change permissions when reading.

Show a config file without comments
Shows a file without comments (at least those starting by #) - removes empty lines - removes lines starting by # or "some spaces/tabs then #'" Useful when you want to quickly see what you have to customize on a freshly installed application without reading the comments that sometimes are a full 1000 lines documentation :) While posting, I saw this http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/1041/display-contents-of-a-file-wo-any-comments-or-blank-lines But it's dirty and incomplete, to my mind My original goal was to remove lines like "\t*#" but I can't figure out how to do a egrep '\t' on a command-line. Two workarounds if needed: $egrep -v 'press control + V then TAB then #' /your/file or $egrep -v -f some_file /your/file #where some_file contains what you want to exclude, example a really inserted TAB

Calculate days on which Friday the 13th occurs (inspired from the work of the user justsomeguy)
Friday is the 5th day of the week, monday is the 1st. Output may be affected by locale.

Do one ping to a URL, I use this in a MRTG gauge graph to monitor connectivity

scping files with streamlines compression (tar gzip)
it compresses the files and folders to stdout, secure copies it to the server's stdin and runs tar there to extract the input and output to whatever destination using -C. if you emit "-C /destination", it will extract it to the home folder of the user, much like `scp file user@server:`. the "v" in the tar command can be removed for no verbosity.

Remove duplicate lines whilst keeping empty lines and order
Remove duplicate lines whilst keeping order and empty lines

Attach screen over ssh
Directly attach a remote screen session (saves a useless parent bash process)

Check if a command is available in your system
Usefull to detect if a commad that your script relies upon is properly installed in your box, you can use it as a function function is_program_installed() { type "$1" >/dev/null } Invoke it and check the execution code is_program_installed "dialog" if [ ! $? -eq 0 ]; then echo "dialog is not installed" exit 1 fi


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: