Commands tagged inum (1)

  • Executing pfiles will return a list of all descriptors utilized by the process We are interested in the S_IFREG entries since they are pointing usually to files In the line, there is the inode number of the file which we use in order to find the filename. The only bad thing is that in order not to search from / you have to suspect where could possibly be the file. Improvements more than welcome. lsof was not available in my case Show Sample Output


    0
    for i in `pfiles pid|grep S_IFREG|awk '{print $5}'|awk -F":" '{print $2}'`; do find / -inum $i |xargs ls -lah; done
    giorger · 2013-01-24 13:57:19 0

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