Commands tagged ncat (3)

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mean color of an image
You can get the mean value for the colours in an image. Then you can determine, in general, how dark or bright is the image and run some other actions based on that. I'll recommend to readjust the brightness of the images using +sigmoidal-contrast option of imagemagick convert command.

Quick glance at who's been using your system recently
This command takes the output of the 'last' command, removes empty lines, gets just the first field ($USERNAME), sort the $USERNAMES in reverse order and then gives a summary count of unique matches.

Generate list of words and their frequencies in a text file.

Print the detailed statistics of transferred bytes by the firewall rules

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Vectorize xkcd strips
Uses ImageMagick and potrace to vectorize the input image, with parameters optimized for xkcd-like pictures.

resize all JPG images in folder and create new images (w/o overwriting)
Convert all jpegs in the current directory into ~1024*768 pixels and ~ 150 KBytes jpegs

Scan a gz file for non-printable characters and display each line number and line that contains them.
Scans the file once to build a list of line numbers that contain non-printable characters Scans the file again, passing those line numbers to sed as two commands to print the line number and the line itself. Also passes the output through a tr to replace the characters with a ?

Carriage return for reprinting on the same line
The above code is just an example of printing on the same line, hit Ctrl + C to stop When using echo -ne "something\r", echo will: - print "something" - dont print a new line (-n) - interpret \r as carriage return, going back to the start of the line (-e) Remember to print some white spaces after the output if your command will print lines of different sizes, mainly if one line will be smaller than the previous Edit from reading comments: You can achieve the same effect using printf (more standardized than echo): while true; do printf "%-80s\r" "$(date)"; sleep 1; done


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