Commands tagged pdf (61)

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Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Update Ping.fm status
Updates your Ping.fm status and websites supported by ping.fm (like twitter, facebook, and google talk).

print code 3-up and syntax-highlighted for easy beach-time study
This is the setup I'm using for my largest project. It gives 357 lines per page (per side), which makes it fairly easy to carry around a significant amount of code on a few sheets of paper. Try it. (I stick to the 80 column convention in my coding. For wider code, you'll have to adjust this.)

Get shellcode of the binary using objdump
Anyone can make the command smaller & easier? :)

MSDOS command to check existance of command and exit batch if failed
This is a command to be used inside of MS-DOS batch files to check existence of commands as preconditions before actual batch processing can be started. If the command is found, batch script continues execution. If not, a message is printed on screen, script then waits for user pressing a key and exits. An error message of the command itself is suppressed for clarity purpose.

add repeated watermark to image

Remove everything except that file
Remove everything except that file with shell tricks inside a subshell to avoid changes in the environment. $ help shopt

execute command on all files of certain types excluding folders that match pattern

Redirect a filehandle from a currently running process.
This command uses the debugger to attach to a running process, and reassign a filehandle to a file. The two commands executed in gdb are p close(1) which closes STDOUT and p creat("/tmp/filename",0600) which creates a file and opens it for output. Since file handles are assigned sequentially, this command opens the file in place of STDOUT and once the process continues, new output to STDOUT will instead be written to our capture file.

Share a terminal screen with others
If you enable multiuser, then you can permit others to share your screen session. The following conditions apply: 1. screen must be suid root; 2. "multiuser on" must be configured in ~/.screenrc; 3. control the others user(s) access with "aclchg": # ----- from ~/.screenrc-users ----- aclchg someuser +rx "#?" #enable r/o access to "someuser" aclchg someuser -x "#,at,aclchg,acladd,acldel,quit" # don't allow these aclchg otheruser +rwx "#?" # enable r/w access to "otheruser" aclchg otheruser -x "#,at,aclchg,acladd,acldel,quit" # don't allow them to use these commands # ----- After doing this (once), you start your session with: $ screen Then, the other user can join your terminal session(s) with youruserid: $ screen -r youruserid/ Note: the trailing "/" is required. Multiple users can share the same screen simultaneously, each with independent access controlled precisely with "aclchg" in the ~/.screenrc file. I use the following setup: # ~/.screenrc-base # default screenrc on any host source $HOME/.screenrc-base source $HOME/.screenrc-$HOST source $HOME/.screenrc-users # ----- Then, the base configurations are in ~/.screenrc-base; the host-specific configurations are in ~/.screenrc-$HOST, and the user configurations are in ~/.screenrc-users. The host-specific .screenrc file might contain some host-specific screen commands; e.g.: # ~/.screen-myhost # ----- screen -t 'anywhere' /bin/tcsh screen -t 'anywhere1' /bin/tcsh # ---- The .screenrc-base contains: # ~/.screenrc-base ## I find typing ^a (Control-a) awkward. So I set the escape key to CTRL-j instead of a. escape ^Jj termcapinfo xterm* [email protected]:[email protected]: autodetach on zombie kr verbose on multiuser on


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