Commands tagged bang-colon (1)

  • Bash's history expansion character, "!", has many features, including "!:" for choosing a specific argument (or range of arguments) from the history. The gist is any number after !: is the number of the argument you want, with !:1 being the first argument and !:0 being the command. See the sample output for a few examples. For full details search for "^HISTORY EXPANSION" in the bash(1) man page.    Note that this version improves on the previous function in that it handles arguments that include whitespace correctly. Show Sample Output


    10
    !:n
    hackerb9 · 2013-09-15 03:41:13 1

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

Adequately order the page numbers to print a booklet
Useful if you don't have at hand the ability to automatically create a booklet, but still want to. F is the number of pages to print. It *must* be a multiple of 4; append extra blank pages if needed. In evince, these are the steps to print it, adapted from https://help.gnome.org/users/evince/stable/duplex-npage.html.en : 1) Click File ▸ Print. 2) Choose the General tab. Under Range, choose Pages. Type the numbers of the pages in this order (this is what this one-liner does for you): n, 1, 2, n-1, n-2, 3, 4, n-3, n-4, 5, 6, n-5, n-6, 7, 8, n-7, n-8, 9, 10, n-9, n-10, 11, 12, n-11... ...until you have typed n-number of pages. 3) Choose the Page Setup tab. - Assuming a duplex printer: Under Layout, in the Two-side menu, select Short Edge (Flip). - If you can only print on one side, you have to print twice, one for the odd pages and one for the even pages. In the Pages per side option, select 2. In the Page ordering menu, select Left to right. 4) Click Print.

View internet connection activity in a browser
In addition to generating the current connections, it also opens then in your default browser on gnome.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Compress blank lines in VIM
This command will squeeze all consequent blank lines (including those with only space and tab charactes) to one. It will also empty the resulting line (remove the "|s/.*//" part if you don't need that).

Server load and process monitoring
In certain cases you mighy need to monitor the server load caused by certain process. For example HTTP, while stress testing apache using ab (apache benchmark) you may want to monitor the server status,load, # of spawned HTTP processes, # of established connections, # of connections in close wait state, apache memory footprint etc.

delay: a simple scheduler
the "delay" utility is an invaluable tool for me. with gnu-screen it allows you to schedule something and have it run and output to the current terminal, unlike "at". You can also use it like "sleep" with seconds and also with date: delay until 13:33 friday && echo test get it from: http://onegeek.org/~tom/software/delay/current/delay.c (author: Tom Rothamel)

Read and write to TCP or UDP sockets with common bash tools
Ever needed to test firewalls but didn't have netcat, telnet or even FTP? Enter /dev/tcp, your new best friend. /dev/tcp/(hostname)/(port) is a bash builtin that bash can use to open connections to TCP and UDP ports. This one-liner opens a connection on a port to a server and lets you read and write to it from the terminal. How it works: First, exec sets up a redirect for /dev/tcp/$server/$port to file descriptor 5. Then, as per some excellent feedback from @flatcap, we launch a redirect from file descriptor 5 to STDOUT and send that to the background (which is what causes the PID to be printed when the commands are run), and then redirect STDIN to file descriptor 5 with the second cat. Finally, when the second cat dies (the connection is closed), we clean up the file descriptor with 'exec 5>&-'. It can be used to test FTP, HTTP, NTP, or can connect to netcat listening on a port (makes for a simple chat client!) Replace /tcp/ with /udp/ to use UDP instead.

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Backup entire system through SSH

Get version of loaded kernel module
Returns the version of the kernel module specified as "MODULENAME", when available.


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: