Commands tagged drop (2)

  • This command drops all the tables of the 'public' schema from the database. First, it constructs a 'drop table' instruction for each table found in the schema, then it pipes the result to the psql interactive command. Useful when you have to recreate your schema from scratch in development for example. I mainly use this command in conjunction with a similar command which drop all sequences as well. Example : psql -h <pg_host> -p <pg_port> -U <pg_user> <pg_db> -t -c "select 'drop table \"' || tablename || '\" cascade;' from pg_tables where schemaname='public'" | psql -h <pg_host> -p <pg_port> -U <pg_user> <pg_db> psql -h <ph_host> -p <pg_port> -U <pg_user> <pg_db> -t -c "select 'drop sequence \"' || relname || '\" cascade;' from pg_class where relkind='S'" | psql -h <ph_host> -p <pg_port> -U <pg_user> <pg_db> See it scripted here : https://gist.github.com/cuberri/6868774#file-postgresql-drop-create-sh


    0
    psql -h <pg_host> -p <pg_port> -U <pg_user> <pg_db> -t -c "select 'drop table \"' || tablename || '\" cascade;' from pg_tables where schemaname='public'" | psql -h <pg_host> -p <pg_port> -U <pg_user> <pg_db>
    cuberri · 2013-12-11 15:39:56 0
  • This command drops all the sequences of the 'public' schema from the database. First, it constructs a 'drop sequence' instruction for each table found in the schema, then it pipes the result to the psql interactive command. See it scripted here : https://gist.github.com/cuberri/6868774#file-postgresql-drop-create-sh


    0
    psql -h <ph_host> -p <pg_port> -U <pg_user> <pg_db> -t -c "select 'drop sequence \"' || relname || '\" cascade;' from pg_class where relkind='S'" | psql -h <ph_host> -p <pg_port> -U <pg_user> <pg_db>
    cuberri · 2013-12-11 15:42:34 0

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

start a tunnel from some machine's port 80 to your local post 2001
now you can acces the website by going to http://localhost:2001/

Blackhole any level zones via dnsmasq
Explanation It creates dnsmasq-com-blackhole.conf file with one line to route all domains of com zones to 0.0.0.0 You might use "address=/home.lab/127.0.0.1" to point allpossiblesubdomains.home.lab to your localhost or some other IP in a cloud.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

List your installed Chromium extensions (with url to each page)
Gives you a list for all installed chrome (chromium) extensions with URL to the page of the extension. With this you can easy add a new Bookmark folder called "extensions" add every URL to that folder, so it will be synced and you can access the names from every computer you are logged in. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Only tested with chromium, for chrome you maybe have to change the find $PATH.

network interface and routing summary

Show number of NIC's, ports per nic and PCI address

Create POSIX tar archive
tar(1) and cpio(1) are not fully platform agnostic, although their file formats are specified in POSIX.1-2001. As such, GNU tar(1) might not be able to extract a BSD tar(1) archive, and ivce versa. pax(1) is defined in POSIX.1-2001. To extract an archive: $ pax -rf archive.tar

Google dictionary of word definitions
$ wget -qO - "http://www.google.com/dictionary/json?callback=dict_api.callbacks.id100&q=steering+wheel&sl=en&tl=en&restrict=pr,de&client=te" this does the actual google dictionary query, returns a JSON string encapsulated in some fancy tag $ sed 's/dict_api\.callbacks.id100.//' here we remove the tag beginning $ sed 's/,200,null)//' and here the tag end There are also some special characters which could cause problems with some JSON parsers, so if you get some errors, this is probably the case (sed is your friend). I laso like to trim the "webDefinitions" part, because it (sometimes) contains misleading information. $ sed 's/\,\"webDefinitions.*//' (but remember to append a "}" at the end, because the JSON string will be invalid) The output also contains links to mp3 files with pronounciation. As of now, this is only usable in the English language. If you choose other than English, you will only get webDefinitions (which are crap).

Figure out what shell you're running

Find the package that installed a command


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: