Commands tagged audio (66)

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check open ports without netstat or lsof

Get the list of local files that changed since their last upload in an S3 bucket
Can be useful to granulary flush files in a CDN after they've been changed in the S3 bucket.

count how many times a string appears in a (source code) tree
grep -o puts each occurrence in a separate line

get all Amazon cloud (amazonws etc) ipv6 subnets

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

Find out when your billion-second anniversary is (was). (on OS X)
This is the same command as this one, but for OS X. http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/3053/find-out-when-your-billion-second-anniversary-is-was.

locating packages held back, such as with "aptitude hold "
locating packages held back, such as with "aptitude hold "

Calculate days on which Friday the 13th occurs (inspired from the work of the user justsomeguy)
Friday is the 5th day of the week, monday is the 1st. Output may be affected by locale.

check open ports without netstat or lsof

Find ulimit values of currently running process
When dealing with system resource limits like max number of processes and open files per user, it can be hard to tell exactly what's happening. The /etc/security/limits.conf file defines the ceiling for the values, but not what they currently are, while $ ulimit -a will show you the current values for your shell, and you can set them for new logins in /etc/profile and/or ~/.bashrc with a command like: $ ulimit -S -n 100000 >/dev/null 2>&1 But with the variability in when those files get read (login vs any shell startup, interactive vs non-interactive) it can be difficult to know for sure what values apply to processes that are currently running, like database or app servers. Just find the PID via "ps aux | grep programname", then look at that PID's "limits" file in /proc. Then you'll know for sure what actually applies to that process.


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