Commands tagged page cache (1)

  • This is just another example of what the nocache package is useful for, which I described in http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/12357/ and that provides the commands nocache <command to run with page cache disabled>cachedel <single file to remove from page cache>cachstats <single file> # to get the current cache state   Often, we do not want to disable caching, because several file reads are involved in a command and operations would be slowed down a lot, due to massive disk seeks. But after our operations, the file sits in the cache needlessly, if we know we're very likely never touching it again. cachedel helps to reduce cache pollution, i.e. frequently required files relevant for desktop interaction (libs/configs/etc.) would be removed from RAM. So we can run cachedel after each data intensive job. Today I run commands like these: <compile job> && find . -type f -exec cachedel '{}' \; &> /dev/null # no need to keep all source code and tmp files in memorysudo apt-get dist-upgrade && find /var/cache/apt/archives/ -type f -exec cachedel '{}' \; # Debian/*buntu system upgradedropbox status | grep -Fi idle && find ~/Dropbox -type f -exec cachedel '{}' \; &> /dev/null # if Dropbox is idle, remove sync'ed files from cache   https://github.com/Feh/nocache http://packages.debian.org/search?keywords=nocache http://packages.ubuntu.com/search?keywords=nocache http://askubuntu.com/questions/122857


    -1
    find /path/to/dir -type f -exec cachedel '{}' \;
    michelsberg · 2013-12-12 18:22:54 4

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