Commands tagged npm (3)

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Clean swap area after using a memory hogging application
When you run a memory intensive application (VirtualBox, large java application, etc) swap area is used as soon as memory becomes insufficient. After you close the program, the data in swap is not put back on memory and that decreases the responsiveness. Swapoff disables the swap area and forces system to put swap data be placed in memory. Since running without a swap area might be detrimental, swapon should be used to activate swap again. Both swapoff and swapon require root privileges.

Find files that were modified by a given command
Traces the system calls of a program. See http://linuxhelp.blogspot.com/2006/05/strace-very-powerful-troubleshooting.html for more information.

Periodic Display of Fan Speed with Change Highlights
Uses the lm-sensors package in Linux to display fan speed. Grep RPM is used to discover lines containing the text RPM, and sed is used to edit out everything but the RPM number. The watch utility is used to update the display every 10 seconds and -d highlights any changes from the previous value. The eval function of Bash is used to execute the command enclosed in the ".." string.

tcmdump check ping
capture only ping echo requests with tcpdump

Erase a word
hit BACKSPACE more than once to delete more words

Generate 2000 images with its number written on it

How To Get the Apache Document Root
Grabs the Apache config file (yielded from httpd) and returns the path specified as DocumentRoot.

give me back my sound card
for when a program is hogging the sound output. finds, and kills. add -9 to the end for wedged processes. add in 'grep ^program' after lsof to filter.

create SQL-statements from textfile with awk
inputfile.txt is a space-separated textfile, 1st column contains the items (id) I want to put into my SQL statement. 39 = charactercode for single tick ' $1 = first column If inputfile.txt is a CSV-file separated by "," use FS= to define your own field-separator: $ awk 'BEGIN {FS=","; }{printf "select * from table where id = %c%s%c;\n",39,$1,39; }' inputfile.txt

Create a .png from a command output and upload to ompdlr.org, give URI
Create a .png from output command or whatever, the upload and give URI from ompdlr.org


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