Commands tagged files (41)

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Batch file name renaming (copying or moving) w/ glob matching.

Ultra fast public IP address lookup using Cloudflare's 1.1.1.1

Detect illegal access to kernel space, potentially useful for Meltdown detection
Based on capsule8 agent examples, not rigorously tested

Stop Flash from tracking everything you do.
Brute force way to block all LSO cookies on a Linux system with the non-free Flash browser plugin. Works just fine for my needs. Enjoy.

gvim in full screen (execute again to toggle full screen on/off)
Only under linux. Requires Gvim compiled with "clientserver" functionality and wmctrl command installed on system. Instead of servername can be used the current edited file name. Put it in a function and map it for get rid of "Press a key" after execution.

Lists unambigously names of all xml elements used in files in current directory
This set of commands was very convenient for me when I was preparing some xml files for typesetting a book. I wanted to check what styles I had to prepare but coudn't remember all tags that I used. This one saved me from error-prone browsing of all my files. It should be also useful if one tries to process xml files with xsl, when using own xml application.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Create a video screencast (capture screen) of screen portion, with audio (the audio you hear, not your mic)
Errors in output don't matter. Stop recording: ctrl-c. Result playable with Flash too. IMPORTANT: Find a Pulse Audio device to capture from: pactl list | grep -A2 'Source #' | grep 'Name: ' | cut -d" " -f2

Ergo browsing 'pacman' queries (Arch)
Alternative1 (grep support): pacman -Ss python | paste - - | grep --color=always -e '/python' | less -R Alternative2 (eye-candy, no grep): pacman --color=always -Ss "python" | paste - - | less -R in ~/.bashrc: pkg-grep() { pacman -Ss "$1" | paste - - | grep --color=always -e "${2:-$1}" | less -R ; } pkg-search() { pacman --color=always -Ss "python" | paste - - | less -R; }

Find usb device
I often use it to find recently added ou removed device, or using find in /dev, or anything similar. Just run the command, plug the device, and wait to see him and only him


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